Melissa Huang Art

Tumbling work by women artists. Check out my own artwork here: http://www.melissahuang.com

reimaginefat:

The artist is Zanele Muholi.  How amazing are these photos?  THEY ARE SO AMAZING AND SO BEAUTIFUL.  Muholi is South African, and she photographs the lesbian community there, which is how she has made these beyond beautiful photographs.  Seriously, my mind is blown to bits. Go read about her right now!

(via fyeahfemaleartists)

theroguefeminist:

huffpostworld:

This ‘personal space’ dress could solve all your public transportation woes.

CREDIT THE INVENTOR: SHE IS AN ARTIST NAMED KATHLEEN MCDERMOTT WHO IS FINISHING HER MFA IN HONG KONG

Also she is developing this technology literally to help women assert their space in public AND MAKE A STATEMENT about how women are treated in patriarchal societies! She is developing other clothes too! You can support her project here: http://www.kthartic.com/index.php?/class/about-urban-armor/

More info:

The dress is the second in a series of projects called Urban Armor, which aim to help women own their space in public arenas that often attempt to deny this right. As McDermott explains in the project statement: “The series arose partly out of my concern over the persistence of ideologies asserted at women in public space through advertising, architecture and socially normative behavior. I began to look for ways women could take more ownership over their personal space in public.”

Basically this woman is a badass artist. Please support her work and spread the word

(via angrywocunited)

dynamicafrica:

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: Senegal with Amy Sall.

Amy Sall is not a hired travel photographer, nor is she a photojournalist on assignment. Yet, her images of her recent trip to Senegal are far more moving, far more real, far richer and possess more authenticity than any embedded journalist could ever attempt to capture. The difference between Amy Sall and other photo amateurs or professionals? Her attachment to Senegal is personal. She’s a first-generation American, born and bred, but culturally, Senegal has never been far away. Additionally, she’s unburdened with the need or pressure to tell a specific kind of story. The narrative was a story to be told along the way, along her path of self-discovery.

For these reasons, and more, I fell in love with her posts on instagram as she visually documented her emotional visit to a place that isn’t quite home, but isn’t a foreign country as well. Through the story she creates with her images, Amy’s photo-documentation illustrates the need for Africans to tell their own stories through any and whatever medium is at their disposal.

Here’s my interview with Amy Sall as we discussed the emotional journey of her multicultural upbringing:

In about five sentences or less, briefly tell us a little about yourself. Who is Amy Sall? How would you introduce and define yourself to those who don’t know you?

I am a 23-year old, first generation Senegalese-American, born and bred in New York City, trying to navigate my life with my best foot forward, while staying true to my values. I think in all aspects of my life, there’s the inherent nexus of integrity, selflessness, and grit. What I do and who I am are intrinsically linked. Currently, I’m a Masters Candidate in Human Rights at Columbia University, focusing on children’s rights and youth issues in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the past, I’ve worked within a few sectors of fashion where I’ve had experience at Vogue, written for Lurve Magazine, and worked for Rick Owens to name a few.

You’re first generation Senegalese-American, born and raised in the US. What was your experience growing up being a part of two very distinct cultures? 

It was interesting, but not easy, growing up between two cultures. It’s not the easiest experience to sift through because it’s quite layered and muddled with all sorts of intricacies. I can say that there were times where my “Africaness” and my “Americaness” had points of contention. I was born only a year after my parents came to the states, so I grew up in a very culturally Senegalese home. Everything in our home was inherently Senegalese, from the food, to the music, to how daily life was constructed.

However, once I stepped outside my home, I was confronted, daily, with the fact that even though I am, in the literal sense of the word, African-American, I did not fit in with the African-American kids. They saw me as other. They saw me as African. They saw me as a dark African. So, it was difficult to reconcile that tension between two cultures as a child. My being rejected by my classmates (and when you are a child, the approval of your peers means everything) led to the resentment and disavowal of my culture and dark skin.

My childhood in that regard was tricky, and it unfortunately caused some damage during my transition into adolescence. There eventually came a point when I just didn’t care about what people thought, and my parents had a heavy had in getting me to that point. Straddling the line between two cultures became easier, and eventually something I thought less about. The biggest relief was ridding the shame I felt toward my “Africanness” as a child. Being African is absolutely the most beautiful thing to me.

On your blog, you mention that you hadn’t been back to Senegal in ten years. What prompted your visit back home? What was the experience like?

What prompted me to go to Senegal was simply realizing that I no longer had the excuse not to go. The last time I was there, I was 13 or 14. The fact that I was approaching the ten-year mark of not being in Senegal was incredibly important and symbolic to me. I decided that I wouldn’t let another year pass without going to Senegal. The possibility of my grandmother’s dying without a chance to see them again started to weigh heavily on me.

Both my grandfathers died when I was younger. One of them I’ve only seen once, the other I’ve seen twice. I regret that I wasn’t able to get to know my grandfathers. The reasons for the 10- year gap vary, but I will attribute them to the unfortunate ills of migration. It wasn’t always easy for my parents to take my siblings and I to Senegal often. Those opportunities did not always present themselves. It’s a sad realization to know that you can’t go home and see your family as often as you would like to, for reasons beyond your control.

So I decided, now that I’m older, nothing was to stop me from going back home and seeing my family. I wanted to get closer to my family, especially with my grandmothers, and develop a real relationship. I wanted to deepen my sense of self and rediscover my roots. It was also important for me to make this trip so that I could see the socio-economic issues of the country with my own eyes, especially as they pertain to children and youth. Much of my graduate research is centered particularly on Senegal, so being on the ground was necessary for the work I’m doing academically, and aim to do professionally.

During your trip back to Senegal you visually documented your stay there by taking and sharing photos on instagram. Was this something you decided before travelling, or was it done on more of a whim? 

I definitely knew I wanted many photos to have as keepsakes, but there were many times where I didn’t bring a camera with me because I just wanted to truly feel Senegal and be immersed in it. When I did have my camera, all I was trying to do was simply capture the country in the truest way possible. I did not want to glamorize or romanticize Senegal. It is an incredibly beautiful, rich and vibrant country, with beautiful people, however there are very real problems that I felt were not to be excluded.  I wanted to share a holistic view of Senegal, from the colors of Gorée to the talibés begging in the streets.

You’ve been blogging for quite some time now so you’re no stranger to sharing bits and pieces of your life online, something I enjoy doing myself. How important was it for you to share this part of your personal life online? How has the response been?

I like the idea that with the Internet, I can carve a space for myself, curate it however I please, engage in a dialogue, and maybe even teach someone something new. I had no expectations when I posted my photos on social media. I was surprised that they garnered the response that they did. People really took a liking to them. I know absolutely nothing about photography. A country as beautiful as Senegal makes it quite easy to photograph. It made me happy that people were appreciating and enjoying my journey, and were able to take part in it. They were discovering Senegal as I was rediscovering it, so it became this shared experience. 

This trip was personal, but it was one that so many can relate to. I am not the only person that has been away from their home country for so long. I am not the only person that hasn’t seen their aunts and uncles in years, or hasn’t hugged their grandmothers in a long time. As personal as this experience was, there were those who were able to connect to it on varying levels. That is what probably surprised me the most, because I didn’t think sharing my trip through these photos could have that effect. I realize that sharing them was much bigger than me, and it was much bigger than a series of Instagram posts. I am really humbled by that. I don’t care about having a large number of followers because I don’t seek validation through that kind of stuff, but I value when someone can take something positive away from what I have shared, whether on the Internet or in real life.

Would you ever consider compiling and publishing your photographs and experience into a photo-book of some sort?

Working on it!

That’s faboulous! Can’t wait ‘til it’s published. Lastly, what are three words you’d use to describe Senegal?

Vibrant, beautiful, home.

Thank you so much, Amy! 

All images via Amy Sall’s instagram.
Amy Sall’s site.

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All Africa, All the time.

(via poc-creators)

kittenwaves:

hello everyone! ♡

i have some very exciting news to announce! i have made my first 16-page zine, which is one of my small projects from earlier on in the year. the zine is hand cut and bound, with 12 brand new illustrations (which won’t be posted anywhere else!), printed in black and white on 80gsm paper. i would love to make more copies of it and selling this zine for quite cheaply (i’ll be able to ship it anywhere in the world too!) so i thought i would post about it here to see if there’s a demand for it at all! (i would also like to make some A4/A3 posters to go with it which will be printed on better quality and some more zines to follow up in this series but that’ll only happen if this zine goes well!) either way, let me know if any of you guys would be interested in getting one of these little silly things! much love ♡

(via babykimchii)

zuky:

aabany-group:

A story that has never been told, Chinese American Exclusion/Inclusion illustrates the often overlooked Chinese experience at the heart of American history. The New York Historical Society’s landmark exhibition will be on from September 26th until May 2015. This exhibit highlights the lives, achievements, culture, struggles, and diversity of Chinese Americans from the 18th century to today.
Please help the New York Historical Society in conveying the richness of our lived experiences. The Many Faces page on the exhibit’s website offers an opportunity for Chinese Americans to tell their own stories. The New York Chinese-American community is invited to share a story and photo. Submissions may be featured in the exhibit or online. Click here to share your story. 

My Chinese American story is that I’ve been telling countless stories of the past two centuries of Chinese American experience, online and offline, for the past 15 years. First arrivals, mining, building railroads, bachelor society, benevolent associations, paper sons, Wong Chin Foo, Chinese Exclusion, numerous legal challenges to anti-Chinese policies in the Supreme Court starting with Chew Heong v. United States in 1884, poetry on the walls in Angel Island, the Los Angeles massacre of 1871, the Rock Springs massacre, the ethnic cleansing campaign known as The Driving Out, all have been told and retold at some length. And of course, Anna May Wong (above, on her famous Chinese identification card which people of Chinese descent were required to carry at all times in the US — even a movie star — at risk of immediate deportation). They’re stories we’ll keep on telling as long as we have to, because they’re stories which are still happening today.

Share your story!

zuky:

aabany-group:

A story that has never been told, Chinese American Exclusion/Inclusion illustrates the often overlooked Chinese experience at the heart of American history. The New York Historical Society’s landmark exhibition will be on from September 26th until May 2015. This exhibit highlights the lives, achievements, culture, struggles, and diversity of Chinese Americans from the 18th century to today.

Please help the New York Historical Society in conveying the richness of our lived experiences. The Many Faces page on the exhibit’s website offers an opportunity for Chinese Americans to tell their own stories. The New York Chinese-American community is invited to share a story and photo. Submissions may be featured in the exhibit or online. Click here to share your story. 

My Chinese American story is that I’ve been telling countless stories of the past two centuries of Chinese American experience, online and offline, for the past 15 years. First arrivals, mining, building railroads, bachelor society, benevolent associations, paper sons, Wong Chin Foo, Chinese Exclusion, numerous legal challenges to anti-Chinese policies in the Supreme Court starting with Chew Heong v. United States in 1884, poetry on the walls in Angel Island, the Los Angeles massacre of 1871, the Rock Springs massacre, the ethnic cleansing campaign known as The Driving Out, all have been told and retold at some length. And of course, Anna May Wong (above, on her famous Chinese identification card which people of Chinese descent were required to carry at all times in the US — even a movie star — at risk of immediate deportation). They’re stories we’ll keep on telling as long as we have to, because they’re stories which are still happening today.

Share your story!

(via thejanitvon)

inkfrommyheart:

camping in the forest - I painted this little (7*9,5 inches) aquarell a week ago at the bank of the Danube. Hope you like it:)

inkfrommyheart:

camping in the forest - I painted this little (7*9,5 inches) aquarell a week ago at the bank of the Danube. Hope you like it:)

b-sama:

'Por Aqui Tudo Bem'(All is well) directed by Pocas Pascoal

Pocas Pascoal is a filmmaker whose work bridges the boundary between documentary and art. She was born in Angola and was the first-ever camerawoman to work in Angolan broadcasting. Pascoal’s films are often very personal and intimate in nature, taking on themes such as war, displacement, helplessness, and familial bonds.

With the beginning of the war in Angola, thousands of refugees escaped the country, leaving their lives and families behind. As an adolescent girl, I was part of that surge. With just a bit of money in our pockets, my mother sent my sister and me in an airplane to Lisbon. With Angola at war, Lisbon appeared to us as a promise of freedom. 


We arrived with our hearts filled with hope. But as my mother prepared to join us, the government forbade Angolans to leave the country. At only 16 years of age, my sister and I were suddenly alone and helpless in Lisbon. In this film I am humbly inspired by my own story and by that of those who I encountered. Just like my sister and I, Alda and Maria, the two heroines in the film, face their difficulties with certain ingenuity and manage to remain united and positive against all odds. Their innocence that is so characteristic to their age will allow them to survive and at the same time become women.

In this story it is my intent to portray a young generation fractured by war, parted from its origins and in danger of losing its identity due to exile.” 

Pocas Pascoal

(via poc-creators)